Posts Tagged "Practice Questions"

Organization and Administration Practice Questions 1-5

Posted by on Jul 13, 2013 in Org & Administration, Practice Questions, Review Topics | 0 comments

Ugh, this is by far the my least favorite aspect of studying for this exam.  Organization and administration…..I have no words to get you pumped about this topic, because I have no words for myself.  To prepare for these questions, I recommend reading chapters 21-22 and slamming your head against each page in agony.  Maybe you will absorb some through osmosis.

I just picked up the book, tried to read some of it and gave up.  I sat around for 5 or so minutes brainstorming a way to cover this.  Here’s what I came up with:

Instead of doing 1 question per post, I’m going to make up all the questions right now as I read through the chapter.

Question 1
What are the four phases of designing a new strength and conditioning facility?
A. Planning, Design, Construction, Operation
B. Predesign, Design, Construction, Preoperation
C. Design, Construction, Preoperation, Operation
D. Needs Analysis, Predesign, Design, Construction

Question 2
When assessing the needs of the athletic program, what should be considered (choose all that apply)
I. Training experience of the athletes
II. Age of the athletes
III. Number of athletes using the facility
IV. Athletic team schedules

Question 3
When designing a strength and conditioning facility, what is an appropriate range of square feet per athlete?
A.  40-50
B.  10-20
C.  80-90
D.  120-140

Question 4
Strength and conditioning facilities should ideally be located (choose all that apply)
I.  On the ground foor
II.  In a below-ground floor
III. As high as possible
IV. On an above ground floor capable of supporting 100lbs per square foot

Question 5
In order to accomodate wheelchairs, what should the minimum width of doorways be?
A.  30 inches
B.  40 inches
C.  28 inches
D.  36 inches

I’m going to break up the questions over a few posts, this is all I felt like coming up with for now.

 

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CSCS Practice Questions – Program Design Part 5

Posted by on Jul 11, 2013 in Practice Questions, Program Design, Review Topics | 3 comments

The last question is a little tricky if you’re a barbell meathead like me.  First thing, make sure you know what a structural exercise is, and for that you should take a look through all the results on my site for a search of the word structural.

Of the four exercises listed below, which is a structural exercise that can only be performed with free weights?

A.  Back Squat
B.  Snatch
C.  Bench Press
D.  Dumbbell Bicep Curl

If you know what a structural exercise is, answer D and C are eliminated, since D is really an assistance exercise and the Bench doesn’t require muscular stabilization of the spine.  That leaves the back squat and the snatch.  However, which can only be performed using free weights?

Well you can certainly back squat using a smith machine, though I don’t recommend it.  You sure as hell can’t snatch with anything but a free weight, because the weight needs to able to move off axis for balance reasons.

The answer is B. Snatch.

I hope you enjoyed my program design practice question series.  For more questions, please visit my practice questions page.

OHS-Behind

 

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CSCS Practice Questions – Program Design Part 4

Posted by on Jul 10, 2013 in Practice Questions, Program Design | 0 comments

The last question I posed to you, the readers, hinted at a principle that is kind of a big deal.  See, strength coaches are apt to say things like:

“Strength is never a weakness!” – Mark Bell, Jesse Burdick (professional powerlifters)

I totally agree and I love this quote, being somewhat of a more meathead inclined individual myself.  Of course there are some nuances that you need to understand about strength to truly know that this is true.  You might fool yourself into saying “but if I weigh 10lbs more….I might be weaker at endurance events.”  True, if you weigh 10lbs more you have more weight to move over the same distance, and yes you would be at a disadvantage.  But strength doesn’t always come at the cost of increased weight.  A lot of strength is purely neurological adaptation.  Strength is indeed never a weakness.

And that is why the SAID principle is so important.  Strength is always good, but it’s best when it’s specific and mimics the sport in question.  Having an athlete do 50 single joint exercises, won’t be as effective as picking a few key exercises that closely mimic the conditions in his or her sport.  So when you encounter a question like the one from my last post:

You are training a sprinter, however due to time constraints you are only allowed to select one strength training exercises  Keeping in mind the SAID principle (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands) pick the most sport specific of these exercises.

A.  Barbell lunge
B.  Barbell Row
C.  Seated calf raise
D.  Leg (knee) curl

Now think about which exercise more closely mimics the position and mechanics of sprinting (I’ve added links to each exercise this time).

The answer should, pretty evidently be A. Barbell Lunge.  The positioning of an upright torso, movement across multiple joints, and the added need for balance during the barbell lunge are three very important reasons the lunge more closely relates to the sport of sprinting, and thus according to the SAID principle will be more beneficial.

Next Question
Of the four exercises listed below, which is a structural exercise that can only be performed with free weights?

A.  Back Squat
B.  Snatch
C.  Bench Press
D.  Dumbbell Bicep Curl

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CSCS Practice Questions – Program Design Part 3

Posted by on Jul 7, 2013 in Practice Questions, Program Design | 4 comments

The last question was:

An athlete you are training wants to improve his performance on the final leg of a 10km race.  You decide repetition training is appropriate for this.  Which of the following describes repetition training?

I.  work:rest ratio: 1:2
II. frequency: 1x/week
III. intensity: greater than VO2 max
IV. duration: 3-5minutes

If you didn’t know the answer to this question, re-read page 499 or better yet reread chapter 18.  I haven’t covered this topic in any of my review posts, so this is a good one to talk about.

First, it’s good to know that the NSCA distinguishes these different types of aerobic endurance training programs:

  • Long, Slow Distance Training
  • Pace/Tempo Training
  • Interval Training
  • Repetition Training
  • Fartlek Training

So do not get confused between interval training and repetition training as I did.

Repetition Training or REPS is defined as work done at intensities greater than VO2 max, with the work intervals lasting between 30 and 90 seconds.  Because this is training is highly dependent on anaerobic metabolism, longer periods of recovery are needed between training sessions.  The recovery period should be roughly 4-6 times as long as the work interval.  This type of training improves anaerobic efficiency, helping in the last push of a race when the runner is fatigued and likely accessing glycogen stores.

Based on this info, you can see that the answer to the previous question is II & III.

Start_women_60_m_Doha_2010

Source: Creative Commons

Next Question
You are training a sprinter, however due to time constraints you are only allowed to select one strength training exercises  Keeping in mind the SAID principle (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands) pick the most sport specific of these exercises.

A.  Barbell lunge
B.  Barbell Row
C.  Seated calf raise
D.  Leg (knee) curl

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CSCS Practice Questions – Program Design Part 2

Posted by on Jun 30, 2013 in Practice Questions, Program Design | 3 comments

First, let’s talk about the last question:

Your athlete recently completed set a 6 rep back squat PR of 285lbs.  However, he recently decided to switch up his training and start preparing for endurance events and you want him to start completing higher volume sets of 15.  What would you predict his 15RM to be?

A.  335lbs B.  215lbs C.  235lbs D.  205lbs

This is a very easy question if you have the table in front of you.  6RM correlates to 85% of 1RM.  So you take 285/0.85 = 335.  15RM is roughly 65% of 1RM, so you take 335 x 0.65 = 215lbs, so the answer is B.

Not very exciting to go over some basic algebra here, so let’s dig into some different techniques to hopefully commit this table to memory.

Here is the table for predicting 1RM:

1RM-spreadsheet

Graphed:

1RM

 

So there are a few quirks about how humans respond to rep-maxes and loading.  Weird that between the first and the second rep, there is a drop of 5%, and the only other time there is a drop that steep is between rep eleven and rep twelve.

 

This is the tactic I used to commit this table to memory.  Only memorize the reps that correspond with a drop of 5%.  In this case, it’s 1,2,4,6,8,10,11,15…I didn’t have to look to remember those numbers, and I know between each of those numbers there’s a 5% drop so I can recreate the other column 100,95,90,85,80,75,70,65.

 

1RM Table Recreation

1RM Table Recreation

Looking back at the original table, you can recreate by filling the rest in by subtracting 3 from the previous number.  So for 5 reps, subtract 3 from 90 and you get 87.  Sometimes it’s 2, but for the purposes of the test you can just use 3 or 2.5 and get close enough.

That’s my trick for remembering the table, hope it helps!

Next Question
An athlete you are training wants to improve his performance on the final leg of a 10km race.  You decide repetition training is appropriate for this.  Which of the following describes repetition training?

I.  work:rest ratio: 1:2
II. frequency: 1x/week
III. intensity: greater than VO2 max
IV. duration: 3-5minutes

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